Oromo athlete Dejene Gezimu clinches victory in the 2016 Vitality Liverpool Half Marathon

(Advocacy for Oromia, 14 March 2016) Athlete Dejene Gezimu has won the 2016 Vitality Liverpool Half Marathon and raised Oromo  (athletic nation) national flag in the events.

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The 22-year-old Oromo athlete, who has a string of other race wins under his belt, recorded a personal best for the half marathon with a time of 01:06:59 – averaging five minutes and seven seconds per mile.

He was 50 seconds faster than his nearest rival, Benjamin Douglas, who was runner-up.

The fastest woman to finish the 13.1-mile course, run in warm sunshine, was Michelle Nolan in a time of 01:20:20 – averaging 6 minutes and eight seconds per mile.

Meanwhile the winners in the 10 mile race were Connor McArdle, on a time of 58 minutes and 41 seconds, and Michelle King in 01:11:26.



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Here are the top five male and female competitors in each of the races.

Men

1: Dejene Gezimu – 01:06:59

2: Benjamin Douglas – 01:07:49

3: Daniel Kestrel – 01:08:09

4: Richard Burney – 01:08:40

5: Nathan Kilcourse – 01:09:21

Women

1: Michelle Nolan – 01:20:20

2: Gemma Connolly – 01:21:25

3: Kirsty Longley – 01:22:18

4: Elissa Morris – 01:22:41

5: Charlotte Mason – 01:24:50

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About advocacy4oromia

The aim of Advocacy for Oromia-A4O is to advocate for the people’s causes to bring about beneficial outcomes in which the people able to resolve to their issues and concerns to control over their lives. Advocacy for Oromia may provide information and advice in order to assist people to take action to resolve their own concerns. It is engaged in promoting and advancing causes of disadvantaged people to ensure that their voice is heard and responded to. The organisation also committed to assist the integration of people with refugee background in the Australian society through the provision of culturally-sensitive services.

Posted on March 14, 2016, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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